At the beginning of the year, Google sent out a message to users about changes to its policy in relation to a forthcoming “sensitive event;” the World Health Organisation (WHO) sent out warnings of a new Disease “X”, and the academics, billionaires, politicians, and corporate elites of the world gathered at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland to under girder such warnings and throw in a few predictions of their own. 

It must be an election year! 

“Rebuilding Trust” was the theme of the annual WEF gathering which covered areas such as security, economic growth, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and long-term strategies for climate, nature, and energy. Knowledge Exchange previously reported, the explosion of Artificial Intelligence (AI) upon society presents both potential benefits and threats, including increased mis-information and disinformation that looks set to increase this year. 

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In this month’s Knowledge Exchange, we evaluate the growing trend of enterprise and mid-market companies to migrate to cloud computing and examine the advantages and potential disadvantages of adopting a hybrid cloud strategy and what is needed to manage the process.

Data visibility and management across multiple environments is one of the biggest headaches for enterprises that have or are in the process of migrating to hybrid, multicloud computing environments, according to recent research from cloud specialist, Nutanix. It found in its global Enterprise Cloud Index, survey of 1,450 IT Decision makers (ITDMs) that
the ‘majority’ of IT teams surveyed were: “Leveraging more than one IT infrastructure…but struggle with visibility of data across environments with only 40% reporting complete visibility into where their data resides.” Although there is no right way or wrong way for businesses to adopt a cloud strategy, Hybridcloud appears to be the more popular way for businesses to drive digital transformation, especially during the last few years following the pandemic.

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Hope for the best by preparing for the worst: Knowledge Exchange examines the five key trends for ITDMs for 2023 and beyond.

As we enter the last few days of 2022 it is a customary tradition to do a bit of navel gazing about what the next year will hold for the IT Market and what hot topics will keep ITDMs awake at night next year.

As we end what has been for many, a rollercoaster of a year, there seems to be plenty of things that will cause a few sleepless nights in the months ahead!

Therefore, it is important to identify and adapt to these trends in a world that has had a perpetual round of shocks in the last decade that in more recent times has seen: a global pandemic, inflation, global supply chain issues, energy and food crises and latterly geopolitical instability through war. There are also many concerns over increasingly sophisticated criminal and state sponsored cyber-attacks. 

With another global recession on the horizon, it is more essential than ever to have the best and most actionable data, combined with continued investment in employee and customer value propositions, in order to ride the wave of these uncertain times.

In the first of this two-part piece, BNZSA will identify the key trends and challenges in the market for 2023 and beyond.

1. Hybrid Infrastructure

Many commentators have been tracking the long-lasting implications of Covid on the workplace and what knock-on effects it has had on the provision of IT services and employee working practices. While the race to look for more collaborative technologies during lockdowns and social distancing measures was a necessary first response to a natural disaster, most industry watchers believe that hybrid and remote working will continue after the pandemic.

In November 2022, a YouGov study on behalf of IT service and consultants NSC noted “… organisations should expect this to be a permanent and persistent pattern in their workplace and to prepare for this long-term shift.”

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